British Artist Releases Black Pigment Available to Anyone but Who?

Can Artist Claim monopoly ownership on Material?

In 2016, Anish Kapoor acquired the exclusive right to use the black pigment known as Ventablack. This material absorbs 99.96% of light, aka the blackest black of all. Many fellow artists resented that such absurdity was allowed in the creative world. Monopoly, really?

Anish Kapoor Black Pigment
Anish Kapoor’s “Cloud Gate” (2006) following the artist’s recent recoating in Vantablack (photo courtesy City of Chicago), from Hyperallergic.

In response, artist Stuart Semple presented a witty and daring solution to represent their voice. He deiced to release a black pigment named Black 2.0 available to everyone after many trials and errors. What’s the catch? Anish Kapoor does not have access to it.

ventablack
Vantablack. Courtesy of Surrey NanoSystems. From Artnet News

Of course, this pigment is not as black as Ventablack, however, it is “the world’s mattest, flattest, black art material.” Black 2.0 is the second blackest material on earth and smells like black cherry. There is no reason to drool over Anish Kapoor’s copyrighted pigment no more. Putting Black 2.0 on market is a brilliant dispute against narcissistic privileged artist’s deed.

 

How Museums Embrace Virtual Reality Technology for Better Visitor Experience

Virtual Reality in Arts & Culture Institutions

VR is the hottest trend in 2017. You’d hear about at least one company looking to incorporate VR in their business model. It’s not exclusive to game & entertainment industry any more.

Museums are gearing up to embrace this newest technology to enhance visitor experiences. For example, Hirshhorn Museum came up with a brilliant way to maximize potentials virtual reality holds for Yayoi Kusama show. As you may know, Kusama’s work offers an intimate and personal experience. One must walk into a closed-off, limited space. As the door closes, the miraculous cosmic view of her work shows up. Thanks to mirrored walls, it feels like infinity. On the other hand, its accessibility is not fully thought out by the artist. Accordingly, the museum decided to provide accessibility to people with mobile disabilities.

“We had to work out how we could make this experience accessible for people with mobility disabilities,” said Beth Ziebarth, director of the Smithsonian’s Accessibility Program.

Isn’t this the true embodiment of “art is for everyone”?  Moreover, they spent two years to prepare the show and four months to bring in VR experiences. Gotta give up for their dedication! Above all, digital technology enabled us to transmit creativity to anyone without discrimination.

 

Written by Joomi lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to preset new and emergin art and to share simple and sincere feedback. It is open to every artist and art enthusiast around the world.
Available on Web Mobile:

 

How to Get the Brain to Like Art from the New York Times

In order to get audiences engaged with art in multiple senses, a neuroscientist and museum director collaborate in augmenting diverse museum programs; for instance, a horror film screening accompanied by a neurologist’s talk or based on a neuroscience observation “our brains are designed to respond to change, diversity and motion,” a smaller size of gallery with fewer artworks is being created.

“There are things that we know about the brain that help explain how we see the world, how we interact with the world as we move through it,” Mr. LeDoux said.

Showing good art or historically significant artifact is one role museums take, however, at the end of the day we can’t help asking what it means to be exposed to art and the meaning of art. Looking over the other fields–interdisciplinary approach–may yield an ultimate answer.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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In Praise of Art Forgeries by the New York Times

Fascinating point of view on fake art.
The art critic, Blake Gopnik, convinces readers technically maybe forgeries are not at fault. They are good reminders of the very essence of modern-contemporary art, distinctive perspectives between geographical regions in practicing art, also the beauty of questioning trusted personal once a while, connoisseurs (aka art experts). And at the end of the day, truth to be told, high art market gave birth to art forgeries.

 

My favorite phrase:

The faker could be considered a faithful assistant of theirs who happened to arrive after they’d died; ditto the hundreds of forgers of Qi Baishi (Gopnik)

 

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

asset-1 asset-3 asset-2