Pile of Candies = master art?

Pile of Candies = master art?

I LOVE watching the web series  The Madness of Art. It gives me a good laugh every time.

This episode questions how the definition of art has shifted away from its original context since the late 19th century.

One of my all-time favorite artists is Felix Gonzalez-Torres. Long before I went deep into art history, he taught me art could be expressed in various forms and it was not always static.  Frankly, it did throw me off, though, when I found out this piece was sold for over 7 million dollars at Christie’s! Whew.

 

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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11 of the World’s Most Unusual Artist Residency by ARTSY

If you’re an artist looking for a place to steer clear of distraction and find your own creative inspirations, this article could be a perfect guidance.

My personal favorite?
Tiny tree house in the middle of the forest in Scotland. 

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Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

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This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Stop with ‘I could do that.’

“I could do that.”

Maybe I’m in bad luck. I hear this self-assured statement almost 9 out of 10 times at art exhibitions. The most recent time was at the annual traveling show from Musée d’Orsay in Korea. This young couple right behind me, probably on a date, lingered awhile in front of Millet’s rough sketch, and said exactly, “You know, I could do that, too.” I didn’t want to be some obnoxious, nosy  museum-goer lecturing why this piece was so important or it was worth a thorough observation. I rushed out of there to stop my urges, and to enjoy the rest of the show without any interruption. No matter how many times you, art lover, hear this, it doesn’t get easier to ignore and exit those moments as if nothing happened.

Pondering my recent unpleasant encounter, this genius video from the Art Assignment, PBS Digital Studios linked to Huffington Post by Katherin Brooks, which investigates “why you should stop saying ‘I could do that.'” It’s a must-see for whoever relates to my story. Especially if you’re not talented with words, but want to convince others about the common perception of art, you will learn how to respond beautifully after.

Short take-aways?

1. Take a moment to think – could you really do that?
2. All right. You’ve decided you could do that.
But why are you doing it?
3. Let’s think deeply about art. (Brooks)

I want to leave this article with Sol Lewitt’s words:

To circle back to Mr. LeWitt, it’s important for us to remember that “the artist may not necessarily understand his own art. His perception is neither better nor worse than that of others.” And that’s pretty comforting.” (Brooks)

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for art enthusiasts and artists by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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