Using Famous Paintings to Detect Early Signs of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s from Hyperallergic

Art is an evidence of life. A psychology research team detected early sings of neurological degeneration by analyzing visual images. It’s interesting to see art being used not as a reflection of society, but a tool to examine one’s health status, and presents a new direction for the future therapy and medication.

In art, the individual brushstrokes self-replicate throughout the painting, creating form, space, and pattern — rather like an artist’s handwriting, but a handwriting which can also require fractal movements from the fingers, hands, arms, and in some cases entire body. We have found that the rhythm of these fractal patterns are captured for eternity in the painting, almost like a DNA footprint. We have found that this ‘code’ stays with an artist even if they change genre.

Basically this thing called “fractals” acting as fingerprints stay with you for life despite age, change of painting style or even medium. However, it was different for those artists who suffered from Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s. In the later works of Salvador Dali’s, his fractals disappeared, which were once evident in his early works.

This research is rather based on scientific method, but reminds me of artist Felix Gonzalez Torress’ quote:  “Above all else, it is about leaving a mark that I existed: I was here. I was hungry. I was defeated. I was happy. I was sad. I was in love. I was afraid. I was hopeful. I had an idea and I had a good purpose and that’s why I made works of art. ”

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Does MFA make you more of a legit artist?

If you’re an artist who’s debating whether to go to grad school or not, here are some candid opinions kindly offered by experts on the topic. The youtuber, Art Thoughtz, makes a bit of snarky comments, so embrace yourself beforehand.

Below is a phrase from Vulture.

What’s different now is that MFA programs are exorbitantly priced luxury items. At the top-shelf East Coast schools like Yale, RISD, SVA, and Columbia, the two-year cost can top $100,000. This doesn’t include room, board, materials, etc. Add all that in, and you’re hovering near a quarter-million dollars. (Vulture)

I think among all, Huffington post makes the most sense to me. They made a whole research on the ratio of artists with MFA to without MFA shown at some renowned galleries in the U.S.. Surprisingly, it was close to 50:50. It gets more insane! Artfacts states 78% of top 50 living artists (in their system) do not hold a MFA. These numbers will blow your mind, really.

Do check out these articles, and maybe it could put your mind at ease, especially if going to grad school means tremendous amount of financial sacrifice and loss of valuable time to you. MFA is not a must-have quality to make it as an artist.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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In Praise of Art Forgeries by the New York Times

Fascinating point of view on fake art.
The art critic, Blake Gopnik, convinces readers technically maybe forgeries are not at fault. They are good reminders of the very essence of modern-contemporary art, distinctive perspectives between geographical regions in practicing art, also the beauty of questioning trusted personal once a while, connoisseurs (aka art experts). And at the end of the day, truth to be told, high art market gave birth to art forgeries.

 

My favorite phrase:

The faker could be considered a faithful assistant of theirs who happened to arrive after they’d died; ditto the hundreds of forgers of Qi Baishi (Gopnik)

 

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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You rock, Google Arts & Culture!

I can’t be the only one constantly astonished by Google’s grand ambition and vision. When they launched Google Arts & Culture, it came off as a shock to me.

To elaborate my reaction, I have to admit my nerdy side (just like others) and one of the long overdue wishes– seeing Mesopotamian Ziggurat or Bodhgaya’s Buddhist temple in real life (right?) or my favorite old masters’ work all in one place. By reading related articles, I could almost get a tad closer look of historical ruins or artwork, but mere referencing images never fulfilled my curiosity or unanswered questions. In my head, I was screaming, ‘can someone please come up with something, maybe like 3-D rendering models?’ To be honest, searching through all the museum databases one by one can be tedious and exhausting. Photographic evidences on textbook were never enough to satisfy my academic thirst, so what could I have possibly done other than dreaming? In that sense, Google Arts & Culture made my dream come true.

 

 

I hope for BBuzzArt to serve a similar role as Google in the near future for art collectors and art enthusiasts in discovering fresh, new, imaginative, young artists from every corner of the world.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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This Artist -Run Space Paved the Way for Mexico City’s Now Flourishing Art Scene by ARTSY

It’s no secret that Mexico City has become THE art hotspot over the past years. Behind its boom in contemporary art, artist-run spaces significantly took part in bringing in international recognition. Let’s take a look at how independent art spaces, often highlighted with thier experimental and radical aspects, were able to survive despite the growing attention of global art market. Mexican visual artist, Yoshua Okón’s words follow:

“It became clear that even though we have greatly benefitted from the market explosion on many levels, it doesn’t really provide everything you need… You need to compensate with other kinds of structures that will cater to spiritual needs and other aspects.”

Click below to read more:

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Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Why We Love–And Need –Public Art from Forbes

I was fortunate to attend a school where the value of art was early on recognized, which eventually led to launch a public art program on site. Not only college students were benefitted from this program, but also many of the community members. They came over to the campus to discover this extraordinary art collection every week. Sol Lewitt, Nancy Rubbins, James Turrell, Marc Quinn, … “museum without walls,” indeed! Looking for these hidden gems on campus brightened up my stressful, mundane college life. It was a perfect breather. My friends would go to James Turrell’s Skyspace to take a quick nap underneath. I’d have an ice-cold coffee and chill by Marc Quinn’s work perfectly fit in its surroundings.

After graduating college, I forgot about my secret stress relief, but reading this article, I was reminded the fond memories of public art and felt strongly connected to the phrase below:

“[Public art] lifts up humanity and challenges the individual who encounters it to think differently about the world.” (Laneri)

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Felix Gonzalez-Torress Interview by Ross Bleckne from BOMB Magazine

FGT That’s how I always work: take your limitations . . .

RB And make them your strengths.

FGT I was telling my students, “Your limitations should be your strengths.” When I first started making art in 1987, I had no money. I had a little tiny studio smaller than this kitchen.

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Felix Gonzalez-Torress’s words go out to all the young artists out there, who are struggling, doubting, starving, sweating, wondering, grumbling, worrying, overthinking, drowning, trembling, agonizing.

DO NOT FEAR to reveal your vulnerability. EMBRACE your inner self.
And MAKE IT BEAUTIFUL with your own hands.

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Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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When Great Art Makes You LOL by Hyperallergic

The article from Hyperallergic made me think of some humorous art pieces.
Many artworks came to my mind, but I would like introduce this particular Northern Renaissance artist’s satirical piece:

The Flatterers by Pieter Brueghel the Younger, 1592.

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Just like his father Pieter the Elder Bruegel, it seems Pieter the Younger depicted Flemish proverbs in his work. The inscription says, “because so much money passes trough my purse, therefore I am always surrounded by flatterers 1592.”

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Check out what Hyperallergic has to say about funny art:

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Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Inevitable Struggles in the Art World

Inevitable Struggles in the Art World
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Photo credit: Art Basel Miami


Big name artists selling work for multimillion $$.

The immense growth in the art market.

 

You might hear these headlines every year if you take a teeny tiny bit of interests in the art world. However, it makes you wonder why on earth those young artists around you who appear to be gifted has not made yet. Would you say that their poor efforts and lethargic nature keep them from being successful? Is it just that simple?

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First thing to clarify is that the art market revolves around mega galleries in large urban cities, which means the majority of the revenue in art comes from their sales. The most esteemed artists alive (meaning THEY SELL) are represented by those galleries. In the case of art auctions, they are Impressionist works by Van Gogh and Monet that are in the highest demands. The primary market takes on sellable artworks which appeal to public taste and need.

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Artist Jeff Koons poses next to one of his sculptures during a press preview of “Jeff Koons: A Retrospective” a exhibition of his work at the Witney Museum of American Art June 24, 2014. Courtesy of Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images.

Then, they put the best resources representing artists to the mass media, in turn, it begins to put a spot light on brand-named artists. They become legendary genius. This is the ecosystem of the art market. It is exactly why although the art market appears to be growing, young artists can’t thrive right away.

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Within the system, emerging artists become discouraged to make art. It comes to the point where they have to decide either to make art that ARE WANTED or to make art THEY WANT. In that process, many of them leave the industry.

Putting aside the depressing truth about the art world, I want to bring up the fact that we’re no longer bound to physical gallery venues in the 21st century. You don’t have to wait to be discovered. You can raise your voice in media outlets and present your works to the public.

 

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BBuzzArt, can light up the path, so that artists can follow the passion for art.
Art enthusiasts can be connected to the world.
Artists
will be encouraged by sincere art lovers at BBuzzArt.

And art lovers will meet the most avant-garde artists from everywhere.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

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This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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