How Has Art Shaped Female Beauty Ideal?

What do you SEE in a work of art?

It could be fashion, architecture, famous myth, scenery, maybe even skillful use of light or brilliant color combination. What I began to notice when studying art history was distinguishing female beauty ideals that vary in time and region. Hmm.. You are not so sure?

This is going to be a very typical comparison that you may find in every intro art history book, but it’s simple as it is. These two images are distinctive representations of Venus. In The Birth of Venus by Botticelli, the goddess of beauty is manifested with sexual, well-proportionated body figure and light skin with rosy cheeks.

~1485 Tempera on wood, 172.5 × 278.5 cm (67 7/8 × 109 5/8 in) Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence Digital restoration: Dale Cotton: http://daystarvisions.com
Sandro Botticelli, The Birth of Venus, Oil on Canvas, 1484–1486
venus_of_willendorf
Venus of Willendorf, Limestone, 28,000 B.C.E – 25,000 B.C.E.

This Venus figurine from 22,000 B.C.E., on the other hand, has far different characteristics on its physicality. You can’t draw many beauty standards from it, but one thing is loud and clear: she’s got huge breasts and hips. Probably that was the parameter of female beauty ideal many centuries ago.

This is just a tiny snippet of what art history can tell us about female beauty ideals. Check out more on ARTSY.

 

 

Written by Joomi lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to preset new and emergin art and to share simple and sincere feedback. It is open to every artist and art enthusiast around the world.
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How to Price Your Artwork from Saatchi Art

First time pricing your work?

Truth to be told, it feels impossible to put a price tag on your precious art. In reality, however, unless you have someone like a gallerist who’s savvy at art market, it comes to a point where you MUST estimate the monetary values of your creative outcomes.

Here’s a reasonable guide on pricing artwork from Saatchi Art. One thing to keep in mind is that you’re taking one step closer to a professional artist’s life.

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                        Written by Joomi lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to preset new and emergin art and to share simple and sincere feedback. It is open to every artist and art enthusiast around the world.
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Nazi’s son gives back art his family took in Poland during World War II from Washington Post

When film Woman in Gold based on real life story came out in 2015, it once again reminded the world of the nightmare of the Holocaust. It was speechless to realize that innocent, loving families were destroyed during the war attributed to their ethnicity, and now we are left with many unresolved issues, one of which is looting and illicit exports. Although in the film the national government was reluctant to retrieve this war-looted object, the Supreme Court was finally in favor of the Jewish family, and Klimt’s painting returned home.

Despite the grand triumph, this is an ongoing fight. It was one single return, but hundreds of thousands of works of art were mercilessly looted during this time and waiting to come home.  Probably that’s why I was deeply touched by this article form the Washington Post. The Nazi official’s son voluntarily gave up the artworks that his father took!

“He gave a good example to others, and we should be happy about this,” Ogorek said. “I assume that various artworks from Poland can be found in private homes in Germany and in Austria. I am sure of that.”

Hope this sets a good example. This illegal action has been universal unfortunately. It doesn’t live in the past. It’s still happeningin every part of Asia, South America, and Middle East. Will this ever come to an end?

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Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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How to Get the Brain to Like Art from the New York Times

In order to get audiences engaged with art in multiple senses, a neuroscientist and museum director collaborate in augmenting diverse museum programs; for instance, a horror film screening accompanied by a neurologist’s talk or based on a neuroscience observation “our brains are designed to respond to change, diversity and motion,” a smaller size of gallery with fewer artworks is being created.

“There are things that we know about the brain that help explain how we see the world, how we interact with the world as we move through it,” Mr. LeDoux said.

Showing good art or historically significant artifact is one role museums take, however, at the end of the day we can’t help asking what it means to be exposed to art and the meaning of art. Looking over the other fields–interdisciplinary approach–may yield an ultimate answer.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Understanding What You Lack of through Art

I believe in destiny. I feel a special bond with someone who I happen to meet despite all the odds. I felt that way strongly about sound artist Christine Sun Kim. Perhaps I could’ve been able to connect to her rather easily because of our similar cultural background. I was a lonesome international student from Korea in college surrounded by colleagues who don’t get my struggles every inch. Full of self-doubt, I was then desperate to find a mentor figure or inspiration who made it in art as an immigrant.

Christine Sun Kim
Photo credit: Artweek

Along the way, I had a delightful encounter with Christine Sun Kim first time. One of the galleries at school had her over for a short term artist-in-residence program. I missed the artist talk because of schedule conflict and in retrospect I don’t think I cared for it as much.

Thank god I had a roommate who attended the talk and filled me in with what a fascinating work Kim does! Christine Sun Kim was born deaf. But her art is about sound. She communicates with the world about her relationship to sound and language through art that are made interactive and inviting. You’re challenged to navigate a basic sense that’s taken for granted within her work: hearing. Take Kim’s words from the Guardian below:

“Being deaf in a world of sound is like living in a foreign country blindly following the cultural rules, customs and behaviours without ever questioning them … Sound is almost like money and power. It’s so powerful that it could either disempower me and my art, or empower me. I chose to be empowered.”

So yes, it was my huge loss not going to her talk. Returning to Korea, I thought I’d never see her work again, but surprisingly she was one of the participant artists at the media biennial in Korea. With all my heart, it felt like a destiny. Not everyone gets a second chance, do they? I finally participated her performance on site (even better), which cleared out my curiosity for unknown subject to some extent.

Again it’s a genuine embodiment of Felix Gonzalez Torress’s words: your limitations should be your strengths. Kudos for Christine Sun Kim.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Using Famous Paintings to Detect Early Signs of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s from Hyperallergic

Art is an evidence of life. A psychology research team detected early sings of neurological degeneration by analyzing visual images. It’s interesting to see art being used not as a reflection of society, but a tool to examine one’s health status, and presents a new direction for the future therapy and medication.

In art, the individual brushstrokes self-replicate throughout the painting, creating form, space, and pattern — rather like an artist’s handwriting, but a handwriting which can also require fractal movements from the fingers, hands, arms, and in some cases entire body. We have found that the rhythm of these fractal patterns are captured for eternity in the painting, almost like a DNA footprint. We have found that this ‘code’ stays with an artist even if they change genre.

Basically this thing called “fractals” acting as fingerprints stay with you for life despite age, change of painting style or even medium. However, it was different for those artists who suffered from Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s. In the later works of Salvador Dali’s, his fractals disappeared, which were once evident in his early works.

This research is rather based on scientific method, but reminds me of artist Felix Gonzalez Torress’ quote:  “Above all else, it is about leaving a mark that I existed: I was here. I was hungry. I was defeated. I was happy. I was sad. I was in love. I was afraid. I was hopeful. I had an idea and I had a good purpose and that’s why I made works of art. ”

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Does MFA make you more of a legit artist?

If you’re an artist who’s debating whether to go to grad school or not, here are some candid opinions kindly offered by experts on the topic. The youtuber, Art Thoughtz, makes a bit of snarky comments, so embrace yourself beforehand.

Below is a phrase from Vulture.

What’s different now is that MFA programs are exorbitantly priced luxury items. At the top-shelf East Coast schools like Yale, RISD, SVA, and Columbia, the two-year cost can top $100,000. This doesn’t include room, board, materials, etc. Add all that in, and you’re hovering near a quarter-million dollars. (Vulture)

I think among all, Huffington post makes the most sense to me. They made a whole research on the ratio of artists with MFA to without MFA shown at some renowned galleries in the U.S.. Surprisingly, it was close to 50:50. It gets more insane! Artfacts states 78% of top 50 living artists (in their system) do not hold a MFA. These numbers will blow your mind, really.

Do check out these articles, and maybe it could put your mind at ease, especially if going to grad school means tremendous amount of financial sacrifice and loss of valuable time to you. MFA is not a must-have quality to make it as an artist.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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In Praise of Art Forgeries by the New York Times

Fascinating point of view on fake art.
The art critic, Blake Gopnik, convinces readers technically maybe forgeries are not at fault. They are good reminders of the very essence of modern-contemporary art, distinctive perspectives between geographical regions in practicing art, also the beauty of questioning trusted personal once a while, connoisseurs (aka art experts). And at the end of the day, truth to be told, high art market gave birth to art forgeries.

 

My favorite phrase:

The faker could be considered a faithful assistant of theirs who happened to arrive after they’d died; ditto the hundreds of forgers of Qi Baishi (Gopnik)

 

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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You rock, Google Arts & Culture!

I can’t be the only one constantly astonished by Google’s grand ambition and vision. When they launched Google Arts & Culture, it came off as a shock to me.

To elaborate my reaction, I have to admit my nerdy side (just like others) and one of the long overdue wishes– seeing Mesopotamian Ziggurat or Bodhgaya’s Buddhist temple in real life (right?) or my favorite old masters’ work all in one place. By reading related articles, I could almost get a tad closer look of historical ruins or artwork, but mere referencing images never fulfilled my curiosity or unanswered questions. In my head, I was screaming, ‘can someone please come up with something, maybe like 3-D rendering models?’ To be honest, searching through all the museum databases one by one can be tedious and exhausting. Photographic evidences on textbook were never enough to satisfy my academic thirst, so what could I have possibly done other than dreaming? In that sense, Google Arts & Culture made my dream come true.

 

 

I hope for BBuzzArt to serve a similar role as Google in the near future for art collectors and art enthusiasts in discovering fresh, new, imaginative, young artists from every corner of the world.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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