British Artist Releases Black Pigment Available to Anyone but Who?

Can Artist Claim monopoly ownership on Material?

In 2016, Anish Kapoor acquired the exclusive right to use the black pigment known as Ventablack. This material absorbs 99.96% of light, aka the blackest black of all. Many fellow artists resented that such absurdity was allowed in the creative world. Monopoly, really?

Anish Kapoor Black Pigment
Anish Kapoor’s “Cloud Gate” (2006) following the artist’s recent recoating in Vantablack (photo courtesy City of Chicago), from Hyperallergic.

In response, artist Stuart Semple presented a witty and daring solution to represent their voice. He deiced to release a black pigment named Black 2.0 available to everyone after many trials and errors. What’s the catch? Anish Kapoor does not have access to it.

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Vantablack. Courtesy of Surrey NanoSystems. From Artnet News

Of course, this pigment is not as black as Ventablack, however, it is “the world’s mattest, flattest, black art material.” Black 2.0 is the second blackest material on earth and smells like black cherry. There is no reason to drool over Anish Kapoor’s copyrighted pigment no more. Putting Black 2.0 on market is a brilliant dispute against narcissistic privileged artist’s deed.

 

How Museums Embrace Virtual Reality Technology for Better Visitor Experience

Virtual Reality in Arts & Culture Institutions

VR is the hottest trend in 2017. You’d hear about at least one company looking to incorporate VR in their business model. It’s not exclusive to game & entertainment industry any more.

Museums are gearing up to embrace this newest technology to enhance visitor experiences. For example, Hirshhorn Museum came up with a brilliant way to maximize potentials virtual reality holds for Yayoi Kusama show. As you may know, Kusama’s work offers an intimate and personal experience. One must walk into a closed-off, limited space. As the door closes, the miraculous cosmic view of her work shows up. Thanks to mirrored walls, it feels like infinity. On the other hand, its accessibility is not fully thought out by the artist. Accordingly, the museum decided to provide accessibility to people with mobile disabilities.

“We had to work out how we could make this experience accessible for people with mobility disabilities,” said Beth Ziebarth, director of the Smithsonian’s Accessibility Program.

Isn’t this the true embodiment of “art is for everyone”?  Moreover, they spent two years to prepare the show and four months to bring in VR experiences. Gotta give up for their dedication! Above all, digital technology enabled us to transmit creativity to anyone without discrimination.

 

Written by Joomi lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to preset new and emergin art and to share simple and sincere feedback. It is open to every artist and art enthusiast around the world.
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Nazi’s son gives back art his family took in Poland during World War II from Washington Post

When film Woman in Gold based on real life story came out in 2015, it once again reminded the world of the nightmare of the Holocaust. It was speechless to realize that innocent, loving families were destroyed during the war attributed to their ethnicity, and now we are left with many unresolved issues, one of which is looting and illicit exports. Although in the film the national government was reluctant to retrieve this war-looted object, the Supreme Court was finally in favor of the Jewish family, and Klimt’s painting returned home.

Despite the grand triumph, this is an ongoing fight. It was one single return, but hundreds of thousands of works of art were mercilessly looted during this time and waiting to come home.  Probably that’s why I was deeply touched by this article form the Washington Post. The Nazi official’s son voluntarily gave up the artworks that his father took!

“He gave a good example to others, and we should be happy about this,” Ogorek said. “I assume that various artworks from Poland can be found in private homes in Germany and in Austria. I am sure of that.”

Hope this sets a good example. This illegal action has been universal unfortunately. It doesn’t live in the past. It’s still happeningin every part of Asia, South America, and Middle East. Will this ever come to an end?

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Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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How to Get the Brain to Like Art from the New York Times

In order to get audiences engaged with art in multiple senses, a neuroscientist and museum director collaborate in augmenting diverse museum programs; for instance, a horror film screening accompanied by a neurologist’s talk or based on a neuroscience observation “our brains are designed to respond to change, diversity and motion,” a smaller size of gallery with fewer artworks is being created.

“There are things that we know about the brain that help explain how we see the world, how we interact with the world as we move through it,” Mr. LeDoux said.

Showing good art or historically significant artifact is one role museums take, however, at the end of the day we can’t help asking what it means to be exposed to art and the meaning of art. Looking over the other fields–interdisciplinary approach–may yield an ultimate answer.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Using Famous Paintings to Detect Early Signs of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s from Hyperallergic

Art is an evidence of life. A psychology research team detected early sings of neurological degeneration by analyzing visual images. It’s interesting to see art being used not as a reflection of society, but a tool to examine one’s health status, and presents a new direction for the future therapy and medication.

In art, the individual brushstrokes self-replicate throughout the painting, creating form, space, and pattern — rather like an artist’s handwriting, but a handwriting which can also require fractal movements from the fingers, hands, arms, and in some cases entire body. We have found that the rhythm of these fractal patterns are captured for eternity in the painting, almost like a DNA footprint. We have found that this ‘code’ stays with an artist even if they change genre.

Basically this thing called “fractals” acting as fingerprints stay with you for life despite age, change of painting style or even medium. However, it was different for those artists who suffered from Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s. In the later works of Salvador Dali’s, his fractals disappeared, which were once evident in his early works.

This research is rather based on scientific method, but reminds me of artist Felix Gonzalez Torress’ quote:  “Above all else, it is about leaving a mark that I existed: I was here. I was hungry. I was defeated. I was happy. I was sad. I was in love. I was afraid. I was hopeful. I had an idea and I had a good purpose and that’s why I made works of art. ”

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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In Praise of Art Forgeries by the New York Times

Fascinating point of view on fake art.
The art critic, Blake Gopnik, convinces readers technically maybe forgeries are not at fault. They are good reminders of the very essence of modern-contemporary art, distinctive perspectives between geographical regions in practicing art, also the beauty of questioning trusted personal once a while, connoisseurs (aka art experts). And at the end of the day, truth to be told, high art market gave birth to art forgeries.

 

My favorite phrase:

The faker could be considered a faithful assistant of theirs who happened to arrive after they’d died; ditto the hundreds of forgers of Qi Baishi (Gopnik)

 

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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This Artist -Run Space Paved the Way for Mexico City’s Now Flourishing Art Scene by ARTSY

It’s no secret that Mexico City has become THE art hotspot over the past years. Behind its boom in contemporary art, artist-run spaces significantly took part in bringing in international recognition. Let’s take a look at how independent art spaces, often highlighted with thier experimental and radical aspects, were able to survive despite the growing attention of global art market. Mexican visual artist, Yoshua Okón’s words follow:

“It became clear that even though we have greatly benefitted from the market explosion on many levels, it doesn’t really provide everything you need… You need to compensate with other kinds of structures that will cater to spiritual needs and other aspects.”

Click below to read more:

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Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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When Great Art Makes You LOL by Hyperallergic

The article from Hyperallergic made me think of some humorous art pieces.
Many artworks came to my mind, but I would like introduce this particular Northern Renaissance artist’s satirical piece:

The Flatterers by Pieter Brueghel the Younger, 1592.

_pieter_brueghel_the_younger-the_flatterers__1592
Just like his father Pieter the Elder Bruegel, it seems Pieter the Younger depicted Flemish proverbs in his work. The inscription says, “because so much money passes trough my purse, therefore I am always surrounded by flatterers 1592.”

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Check out what Hyperallergic has to say about funny art:

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Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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