Why We Love–And Need –Public Art from Forbes

I was fortunate to attend a school where the value of art was early on recognized, which eventually led to launch a public art program on site. Not only college students were benefitted from this program, but also many of the community members. They came over to the campus to discover this extraordinary art collection every week. Sol Lewitt, Nancy Rubbins, James Turrell, Marc Quinn, … “museum without walls,” indeed! Looking for these hidden gems on campus brightened up my stressful, mundane college life. It was a perfect breather. My friends would go to James Turrell’s Skyspace to take a quick nap underneath. I’d have an ice-cold coffee and chill by Marc Quinn’s work perfectly fit in its surroundings.

After graduating college, I forgot about my secret stress relief, but reading this article, I was reminded the fond memories of public art and felt strongly connected to the phrase below:

“[Public art] lifts up humanity and challenges the individual who encounters it to think differently about the world.” (Laneri)

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
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Inevitable Struggles in the Art World

Inevitable Struggles in the Art World
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Photo credit: Art Basel Miami


Big name artists selling work for multimillion $$.

The immense growth in the art market.

 

You might hear these headlines every year if you take a teeny tiny bit of interests in the art world. However, it makes you wonder why on earth those young artists around you who appear to be gifted has not made yet. Would you say that their poor efforts and lethargic nature keep them from being successful? Is it just that simple?

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First thing to clarify is that the art market revolves around mega galleries in large urban cities, which means the majority of the revenue in art comes from their sales. The most esteemed artists alive (meaning THEY SELL) are represented by those galleries. In the case of art auctions, they are Impressionist works by Van Gogh and Monet that are in the highest demands. The primary market takes on sellable artworks which appeal to public taste and need.

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Artist Jeff Koons poses next to one of his sculptures during a press preview of “Jeff Koons: A Retrospective” a exhibition of his work at the Witney Museum of American Art June 24, 2014. Courtesy of Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images.

Then, they put the best resources representing artists to the mass media, in turn, it begins to put a spot light on brand-named artists. They become legendary genius. This is the ecosystem of the art market. It is exactly why although the art market appears to be growing, young artists can’t thrive right away.

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Within the system, emerging artists become discouraged to make art. It comes to the point where they have to decide either to make art that ARE WANTED or to make art THEY WANT. In that process, many of them leave the industry.

Putting aside the depressing truth about the art world, I want to bring up the fact that we’re no longer bound to physical gallery venues in the 21st century. You don’t have to wait to be discovered. You can raise your voice in media outlets and present your works to the public.

 

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BBuzzArt, can light up the path, so that artists can follow the passion for art.
Art enthusiasts can be connected to the world.
Artists
will be encouraged by sincere art lovers at BBuzzArt.

And art lovers will meet the most avant-garde artists from everywhere.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

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This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Pile of Candies = master art?

Pile of Candies = master art?

I LOVE watching the web series  The Madness of Art. It gives me a good laugh every time.

This episode questions how the definition of art has shifted away from its original context since the late 19th century.

One of my all-time favorite artists is Felix Gonzalez-Torres. Long before I went deep into art history, he taught me art could be expressed in various forms and it was not always static.  Frankly, it did throw me off, though, when I found out this piece was sold for over 7 million dollars at Christie’s! Whew.

 

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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11 of the World’s Most Unusual Artist Residency by ARTSY

If you’re an artist looking for a place to steer clear of distraction and find your own creative inspirations, this article could be a perfect guidance.

My personal favorite?
Tiny tree house in the middle of the forest in Scotland. 

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Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

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This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Stop with ‘I could do that.’

“I could do that.”

Maybe I’m in bad luck. I hear this self-assured statement almost 9 out of 10 times at art exhibitions. The most recent time was at the annual traveling show from Musée d’Orsay in Korea. This young couple right behind me, probably on a date, lingered awhile in front of Millet’s rough sketch, and said exactly, “You know, I could do that, too.” I didn’t want to be some obnoxious, nosy  museum-goer lecturing why this piece was so important or it was worth a thorough observation. I rushed out of there to stop my urges, and to enjoy the rest of the show without any interruption. No matter how many times you, art lover, hear this, it doesn’t get easier to ignore and exit those moments as if nothing happened.

Pondering my recent unpleasant encounter, this genius video from the Art Assignment, PBS Digital Studios linked to Huffington Post by Katherin Brooks, which investigates “why you should stop saying ‘I could do that.'” It’s a must-see for whoever relates to my story. Especially if you’re not talented with words, but want to convince others about the common perception of art, you will learn how to respond beautifully after.

Short take-aways?

1. Take a moment to think – could you really do that?
2. All right. You’ve decided you could do that.
But why are you doing it?
3. Let’s think deeply about art. (Brooks)

I want to leave this article with Sol Lewitt’s words:

To circle back to Mr. LeWitt, it’s important for us to remember that “the artist may not necessarily understand his own art. His perception is neither better nor worse than that of others.” And that’s pretty comforting.” (Brooks)

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for art enthusiasts and artists by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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