How Has Art Shaped Female Beauty Ideal?

What do you SEE in a work of art?

It could be fashion, architecture, famous myth, scenery, maybe even skillful use of light or brilliant color combination. What I began to notice when studying art history was distinguishing female beauty ideals that vary in time and region. Hmm.. You are not so sure?

This is going to be a very typical comparison that you may find in every intro art history book, but it’s simple as it is. These two images are distinctive representations of Venus. In The Birth of Venus by Botticelli, the goddess of beauty is manifested with sexual, well-proportionated body figure and light skin with rosy cheeks.

~1485 Tempera on wood, 172.5 × 278.5 cm (67 7/8 × 109 5/8 in) Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence Digital restoration: Dale Cotton: http://daystarvisions.com
Sandro Botticelli, The Birth of Venus, Oil on Canvas, 1484–1486
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Venus of Willendorf, Limestone, 28,000 B.C.E – 25,000 B.C.E.

This Venus figurine from 22,000 B.C.E., on the other hand, has far different characteristics on its physicality. You can’t draw many beauty standards from it, but one thing is loud and clear: she’s got huge breasts and hips. Probably that was the parameter of female beauty ideal many centuries ago.

This is just a tiny snippet of what art history can tell us about female beauty ideals. Check out more on ARTSY.

 

 

Written by Joomi lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to preset new and emergin art and to share simple and sincere feedback. It is open to every artist and art enthusiast around the world.
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Understanding What You Lack of through Art

I believe in destiny. I feel a special bond with someone who I happen to meet despite all the odds. I felt that way strongly about sound artist Christine Sun Kim. Perhaps I could’ve been able to connect to her rather easily because of our similar cultural background. I was a lonesome international student from Korea in college surrounded by colleagues who don’t get my struggles every inch. Full of self-doubt, I was then desperate to find a mentor figure or inspiration who made it in art as an immigrant.

Christine Sun Kim
Photo credit: Artweek

Along the way, I had a delightful encounter with Christine Sun Kim first time. One of the galleries at school had her over for a short term artist-in-residence program. I missed the artist talk because of schedule conflict and in retrospect I don’t think I cared for it as much.

Thank god I had a roommate who attended the talk and filled me in with what a fascinating work Kim does! Christine Sun Kim was born deaf. But her art is about sound. She communicates with the world about her relationship to sound and language through art that are made interactive and inviting. You’re challenged to navigate a basic sense that’s taken for granted within her work: hearing. Take Kim’s words from the Guardian below:

“Being deaf in a world of sound is like living in a foreign country blindly following the cultural rules, customs and behaviours without ever questioning them … Sound is almost like money and power. It’s so powerful that it could either disempower me and my art, or empower me. I chose to be empowered.”

So yes, it was my huge loss not going to her talk. Returning to Korea, I thought I’d never see her work again, but surprisingly she was one of the participant artists at the media biennial in Korea. With all my heart, it felt like a destiny. Not everyone gets a second chance, do they? I finally participated her performance on site (even better), which cleared out my curiosity for unknown subject to some extent.

Again it’s a genuine embodiment of Felix Gonzalez Torress’s words: your limitations should be your strengths. Kudos for Christine Sun Kim.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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You rock, Google Arts & Culture!

I can’t be the only one constantly astonished by Google’s grand ambition and vision. When they launched Google Arts & Culture, it came off as a shock to me.

To elaborate my reaction, I have to admit my nerdy side (just like others) and one of the long overdue wishes– seeing Mesopotamian Ziggurat or Bodhgaya’s Buddhist temple in real life (right?) or my favorite old masters’ work all in one place. By reading related articles, I could almost get a tad closer look of historical ruins or artwork, but mere referencing images never fulfilled my curiosity or unanswered questions. In my head, I was screaming, ‘can someone please come up with something, maybe like 3-D rendering models?’ To be honest, searching through all the museum databases one by one can be tedious and exhausting. Photographic evidences on textbook were never enough to satisfy my academic thirst, so what could I have possibly done other than dreaming? In that sense, Google Arts & Culture made my dream come true.

 

 

I hope for BBuzzArt to serve a similar role as Google in the near future for art collectors and art enthusiasts in discovering fresh, new, imaginative, young artists from every corner of the world.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Why We Love–And Need –Public Art from Forbes

I was fortunate to attend a school where the value of art was early on recognized, which eventually led to launch a public art program on site. Not only college students were benefitted from this program, but also many of the community members. They came over to the campus to discover this extraordinary art collection every week. Sol Lewitt, Nancy Rubbins, James Turrell, Marc Quinn, … “museum without walls,” indeed! Looking for these hidden gems on campus brightened up my stressful, mundane college life. It was a perfect breather. My friends would go to James Turrell’s Skyspace to take a quick nap underneath. I’d have an ice-cold coffee and chill by Marc Quinn’s work perfectly fit in its surroundings.

After graduating college, I forgot about my secret stress relief, but reading this article, I was reminded the fond memories of public art and felt strongly connected to the phrase below:

“[Public art] lifts up humanity and challenges the individual who encounters it to think differently about the world.” (Laneri)

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Inevitable Struggles in the Art World

Inevitable Struggles in the Art World
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Photo credit: Art Basel Miami


Big name artists selling work for multimillion $$.

The immense growth in the art market.

 

You might hear these headlines every year if you take a teeny tiny bit of interests in the art world. However, it makes you wonder why on earth those young artists around you who appear to be gifted has not made yet. Would you say that their poor efforts and lethargic nature keep them from being successful? Is it just that simple?

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First thing to clarify is that the art market revolves around mega galleries in large urban cities, which means the majority of the revenue in art comes from their sales. The most esteemed artists alive (meaning THEY SELL) are represented by those galleries. In the case of art auctions, they are Impressionist works by Van Gogh and Monet that are in the highest demands. The primary market takes on sellable artworks which appeal to public taste and need.

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Artist Jeff Koons poses next to one of his sculptures during a press preview of “Jeff Koons: A Retrospective” a exhibition of his work at the Witney Museum of American Art June 24, 2014. Courtesy of Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images.

Then, they put the best resources representing artists to the mass media, in turn, it begins to put a spot light on brand-named artists. They become legendary genius. This is the ecosystem of the art market. It is exactly why although the art market appears to be growing, young artists can’t thrive right away.

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Within the system, emerging artists become discouraged to make art. It comes to the point where they have to decide either to make art that ARE WANTED or to make art THEY WANT. In that process, many of them leave the industry.

Putting aside the depressing truth about the art world, I want to bring up the fact that we’re no longer bound to physical gallery venues in the 21st century. You don’t have to wait to be discovered. You can raise your voice in media outlets and present your works to the public.

 

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BBuzzArt, can light up the path, so that artists can follow the passion for art.
Art enthusiasts can be connected to the world.
Artists
will be encouraged by sincere art lovers at BBuzzArt.

And art lovers will meet the most avant-garde artists from everywhere.

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

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This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Pile of Candies = master art?

Pile of Candies = master art?

I LOVE watching the web series  The Madness of Art. It gives me a good laugh every time.

This episode questions how the definition of art has shifted away from its original context since the late 19th century.

One of my all-time favorite artists is Felix Gonzalez-Torres. Long before I went deep into art history, he taught me art could be expressed in various forms and it was not always static.  Frankly, it did throw me off, though, when I found out this piece was sold for over 7 million dollars at Christie’s! Whew.

 

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

 

This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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11 of the World’s Most Unusual Artist Residency by ARTSY

If you’re an artist looking for a place to steer clear of distraction and find your own creative inspirations, this article could be a perfect guidance.

My personal favorite?
Tiny tree house in the middle of the forest in Scotland. 

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Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

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This article was published for artists and art enthusiasts by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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Stop with ‘I could do that.’

“I could do that.”

Maybe I’m in bad luck. I hear this self-assured statement almost 9 out of 10 times at art exhibitions. The most recent time was at the annual traveling show from Musée d’Orsay in Korea. This young couple right behind me, probably on a date, lingered awhile in front of Millet’s rough sketch, and said exactly, “You know, I could do that, too.” I didn’t want to be some obnoxious, nosy  museum-goer lecturing why this piece was so important or it was worth a thorough observation. I rushed out of there to stop my urges, and to enjoy the rest of the show without any interruption. No matter how many times you, art lover, hear this, it doesn’t get easier to ignore and exit those moments as if nothing happened.

Pondering my recent unpleasant encounter, this genius video from the Art Assignment, PBS Digital Studios linked to Huffington Post by Katherin Brooks, which investigates “why you should stop saying ‘I could do that.'” It’s a must-see for whoever relates to my story. Especially if you’re not talented with words, but want to convince others about the common perception of art, you will learn how to respond beautifully after.

Short take-aways?

1. Take a moment to think – could you really do that?
2. All right. You’ve decided you could do that.
But why are you doing it?
3. Let’s think deeply about art. (Brooks)

I want to leave this article with Sol Lewitt’s words:

To circle back to Mr. LeWitt, it’s important for us to remember that “the artist may not necessarily understand his own art. His perception is neither better nor worse than that of others.” And that’s pretty comforting.” (Brooks)

Written by Joomi Lee, BBuzzArt Marketing

This article was published for art enthusiasts and artists by BBuzzArt.

BBuzzArt is an art social platform to present new and emerging art and to share simple and sincere feedback.  It is open to every artists and art enthusiasts around the world.
Available on Web and Mobile:

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